The history of the gasket.

Seal technology has pushed us forward since 1820.

Challenges are the mother of innovation and call us to do better. Here is a small glimps at how far we have come.

The First Gasket

In 1820 some of the very first iterations of gaskets were made from pack iron fillings, sulphur powder, and water were combined to make a solid iron sulphate seal. Many other gaskets made before 1840 were constructed from pieces of rope called Oakum.

1820

Vulcanization

A huge step forward happened in 1850 with the discovery of vulcanization which allowed us to create heat resistant rubber gaskets. Vulcanization is the chemical process of improving the physical properties of natural or synthetic rubber. This process brought about a rubber that has higher tensile strength and resistance to swelling and abrasion. It also allowed the rubber to be elastic over a greater range of temperatures. To put it simplyu, vulcanization is heating rubber with sulfur.

1850

Asbestos

Our industry started using asbestos for most of the 20th century and took advantage of it’s uniquely fibrous yet durable nature by mixing it into many building materials and weaving it into rope and cloth. Gaskets were made from asbestos because they could be formed into a flexible, fireproof solution for sealing bewilders, furnaces, and ovens. Other asbestos gaskets were creased with wire inserts giving them extra strength and sophisticated types were made from concentric layers of metal and asbestos which created an extremely strong seal but left pure asbestos fibers exposed to the open air. In the 1980s asbestos use began to decrease when it became linked to mesothelioma and other pulmonary diseases. Since then all production of asbestos has been stooped due to heavy regulation or outright banning. From 2000 on several lawsuits have been won against asbestos.

1899

Non-Asbestos

These materials are named this way because they fill the gap that asbestos gaskets used to fill with there excellent heat resistance properties but they were created without asbestos. After asbestos was outlawed a replacement was in high demand so materials were developed to perform the same role that asbestos was able to fill but without the dangers to human health. You will find aramid fibre (Kevlar) and other non-organic fibres in these products. They are created by blending different polymers together for different applications.

 

1923

Asbestos

Our industry started using asbestos for most of the 20th century and took advantage of it’s uniquely fibrous yet durable nature by mixing it into many building materials and weaving it into rope and cloth. Gaskets were made from asbestos because they could be formed into a flexible, fireproof solution for sealing bewilders, furnaces, and ovens. Other asbestos gaskets were creased with wire inserts giving them extra strength and sophisticated types were made from concentric layers of metal and asbestos which created an extremely strong seal but left pure asbestos fibers exposed to the open air. In the 1980s asbestos use began to decrease when it became linked to mesothelioma and other pulmonary diseases. Since then all production of asbestos has been stooped due to heavy regulation or outright banning. From 2000 on several lawsuits have been won against asbestos.

1820

1850

1899

1923

Vulcanization

A huge step forward happened in 1850 with the discovery of vulcanization which allowed us to create heat resistant rubber gaskets. Vulcanization is the chemical process of improving the physical properties of natural or synthetic rubber. This process brought about a rubber that has higher tensile strength and resistance to swelling and abrasion. It also allowed the rubber to be elastic over a greater range of temperatures. To put it simplyu, vulcanization is heating rubber with sulfur.

Non-Asbestos

These materials are named this way because they fill the gap that asbestos gaskets used to fill with there excellent heat resistance properties but they were created without asbestos. After asbestos was outlawed a replacement was in high demand so materials were developed to perform the same role that asbestos was able to fill but without the dangers to human health. You will find aramid fibre (Kevlar) and other non-organic fibres in these products. They are created by blending different polymers together for different applications.

 

Today

Gaskets are made from a wide range of materials, including but not limited to: paper, rubber, silicone, metal, cork, neoprene, nitrile rubber, fiberglass, and plastic polymers. They can be applied to use in passenger, heavy duty, and off- road vehicle engines, in addition to agricultural machine engines. There are hundreds of gasket manufactures worldwide and the value of the automotive gasket and seal market is estimated to reach $12.3 billion by 2020.

 

2000s

Tomorrow

With technology and robotics getting more advanced everyday, and the human desire to create vessels that explore new territories, it’s likely that the gaskets and seals of the future will be developed to handle prolonged more advanced space travel, or allow for us to explore the ocean at depths we have not reached yet!

Beyond

How far will you go?

Your goals and challenges deserve a plan that will rise to meet them with excellence and foresight. We take great care in developing plans in order to perfectly suite our customers needs and deliver a superior product that meets and exceeds all the standards set before it.